BSF, CRPF and other Paramilitary Forces Discussion

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 10 May 2004 18:01

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/200710242.cms

JULY 09, 2001

...

To check frequent infiltrations across the Indo-Pak border on the Gujarat side, "a Quick Reaction Team (QRT)" called the 'Tat Rakshak' have been formed since the past one and half years", Bhatia informed.

Further, the forces had also begun joint exercises every fortnight with the Indian Army, Coast Guards and the Border Security Force at the Joint Operation Centre located in the BSF centre at Bhuj.

...

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Rupak » 11 May 2004 10:06

P.S. Tat Rakshak = Coast Gaurd

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Manne » 11 May 2004 10:47

Rupak,

Tat Rakshak is indeed what Coast Guards are called but I think this Tat Rakshak is some sort of a cross between CG, BSF and SF.

BTW, check the numbers of Su's in that report....something doesn't sound right. DDM ?

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 12 May 2004 22:23

Question: why is an IAF Air Marshal making anncouncements about an anti-infiltration QRT in the first place?

Further, the forces :confused:
had also begun joint exercises every fortnight with the Indian Army, Coast Guards and the Border Security Force at the Joint Operation Centre located in the BSF centre at Bhuj.
The "Tat Rakshak" might be related to acquisition of floating BOPs by the BSF, but AFAIK they have come in recently (2003?) and not in 1999.

Or else CG hovercraft are probably got something to do with this.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 19 May 2004 20:55

A bit OT...

Indian Navy opens fire on Pak fishermen
http://in.rediff.com/news/2004/may/18pak.htm

the boat was spotted in suspicious circumstances, approximately ten nautical miles off the Gujarat coast.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 23 May 2004 18:26

http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_771652,0006.htm

Army to train Jharkhand cops to fight Maoists

Indo-Asian News Service
Ranchi, May 21

Rattled by an increase in the casualty of policemen in Maoist violence, Jharkhand has called in the army to train its newly recruited cops.

Violence involving the Maoist Coordination Committee (MCC) and the People's War Group (PWG) has resulted in the death of 492 persons, including 188 cops, in 18 of the state's 22 districts since the state came into being in November 2000. In one incident in April 2004 alone, the state lost 30 policemen in the Saranda jungle.

The state will send the 8,000 personnel that it plans to recruit by June to army camps for training, according to a senior officer involved in anti-terror operations. He said the training would be "focused on how to deal with guerrilla warfare in which Maoist insurgents are trained."

He said the decision to call in the army to train the recruits was prompted by the success of the Special Task Force (STF) in keeping the extremist elements under check for a peaceful Lok Sabha poll. The elections this time were comparatively much more peaceful than on previous occasions.

The state has already completed the recruitment of 4,000 personnel from tribal and Dalit categories as part of its plans to add 12,000 cops to take on the Maoist threat.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby shaunak » 24 May 2004 20:32

Originally posted by aditya.g:
http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_771652,0006.htm

[b]Army to train Jharkhand cops to fight Maoists

Indo-Asian News Service
Ranchi, May 21

Rattled by an increase in the casualty of policemen in Maoist violence, Jharkhand has called in the army to train its newly recruited cops.

Violence involving the Maoist Coordination Committee (MCC) and the People's War Group (PWG) has resulted in the death of 492 persons, including 188 cops, in 18 of the state's 22 districts since the state came into being in November 2000. In one incident in April 2004 alone, the state lost 30 policemen in the Saranda jungle.

The state will send the 8,000 personnel that it plans to recruit by June to army camps for training, according to a senior officer involved in anti-terror operations. He said the training would be "focused on how to deal with guerrilla warfare in which Maoist insurgents are trained."

He said the decision to call in the army to train the recruits was prompted by the success of the Special Task Force (STF) in keeping the extremist elements under check for a peaceful Lok Sabha poll. The elections this time were comparatively much more peaceful than on previous occasions.

The state has already completed the recruitment of 4,000 personnel from tribal and Dalit categories as part of its plans to add 12,000 cops to take on the Maoist threat.
[/b]
Why not let loose a battalion of the Para (SF) to work there like the SAS was let loose in Northern Ireland?

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 27 May 2004 13:16

Some more (bad) news about co-op between BSF and Navy in the swamps of gujarat,

From this months news folder:

http://www.gunaah.com/

Navy and BSF Officials missing at sea

By Our Correspondent,
Ahmedabad, May 18

In a shocking incident a boat carrying 15 Indian Naval and BSF personals was reported missing at sea near Jhakau port of Jamnagar district.

The boat suddenly went missing yesterday while conducting a joint exercise of the navy and BSF officials, sources from Indian Navy informed. They further alleged that bad weather at the sea near Gulf of Kutch could be a decisive factor for the disappearance of the boat.

Naval officials said a search and a rescue team has been sent to Kori creek near Kutch district and the entire area is searched extensively.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Joeqp » 27 May 2004 15:52

<I>Why not let loose a battalion of the Para (SF) to work there like the SAS was let loose in Northern Ireland?</I>

Because, as far as possible, the Army should <B>not</B> be fighting its own people. This is a job for the police.

The problems with Maoists (and Naxalites, etc.) is simply that of bad governance.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 27 May 2004 19:04

http://www.hindu.com/2004/05/26/stories/2004052602841200.htm

Army for separate info network in border areas

By Our Special Correspondent

NEW DELHI, MAY 25. Acknowledging the importance of communication technologies in warfare, the Army is in favour of a separate organisation to establish a state-of-the-art communication network in the border areas. The Army can use part of the infrastructure while the civilian population can avail of the rest. The arrangement would be on the lines of the roads developed and maintained by the Border Roads Organisation, manned by Army officials.

"Due to lack of corporate willingness [color=red][typo?]</FONT> to go to the border areas, there is a need to raise an agency similar to the BRO for the construction of the info structure in these areas. This will lead to development of a sound info structure and narrowing of the digital divide," said the Army's Signal Officer-in-Chief, Davinder Kumar, at a seminar on `Info structure for network centric warfare (NCW)', organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) here today.

The next priority would be setting up an organisation that ....

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby ssmitra » 27 May 2004 23:14

Originally posted by Manavendra:
Why not let loose a battalion of the Para (SF) to work there like the SAS was let loose in Northern Ireland?

Because, as far as possible, the Army should [b]not
be fighting its own people. This is a job for the police.

The problems with Maoists (and Naxalites, etc.) is simply that of bad governance.[/b]
I completely agree with that. The State police should be responsible for dealing with the Maoists etc.. I think its high time that the state govt's be made responsible for maintaining a capable Armed Police. Punjab, Maharashtra and J&K are very good examples. Most states run after the CRPF and BSF everytime there is trouble. The Home ministry should make it mandatory for states to handle their own problem and make them pay for training and maintenance at par with CRPF and BSF etc..

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 28 May 2004 09:09

Most states run after the CRPF and BSF everytime there is trouble. The Home ministry should make it mandatory for states to handle their own problem and make them pay for training and maintenance at par with CRPF and BSF etc..

The State govts do this because it saves them additional expenditure. With prescnce of central troops the people get the impression that their govt is doing something anf ofcourse since it never works out everybody can blame the CRPF and CISF for incompetence.

The central govt does thise becuase it allows them to exercise additional influence over the states.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 07 Jun 2004 19:03

Posted by Aditya_C

Long URL - New Indian Express

CRPF deployment in Kashmir valley put on hold

Sunday June 6 2004 19:02 IST
PTI

NEW DELHI: In the backdrop of the militant attack on Srinagar-Jammu national highway which killed 29 people, the Centre has put on hold pulling out of BSF from counter-insurgency operations in Jammu and Kashmir and replacing it with CRPF.

The circular issued by the Union Home Ministry did not state any reason for it and only said the taking over of the counter-insurgency operations in the state by CRPF had been put on hold till October 30 this year, official sources said.

However, it is beleived that the failure of CRPF, which was responsible for sanitising the highway, to detect the deadily explosive on May 23 which led to the death of BSF personnel and their family members travelling in a bus, could be one of the reasons.

The sources said before taking over the operations in the valley, the CRPF was likey to be given more training to deal with the situation.

So far, CRPF had taken over at six places in the valley from the BSF but now as per the latest directive from the Centre, "the status quo should be maintained", they said.

The take over process had started in November last year and was expected to be completed by next month.

The decision was taken after Union Home Secertary Anil Baijal held a series of meetings with Special Secretary (J and K) B B Mishra, Director General of BSF Ajai Raj Sharma and CRPF chief J K Sinha.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 12 Jun 2004 20:57

http://www.keralanext.com/news/index.asp?id=38704

Army to electrify border villages in Kashmir

10-June-2004

...

Villages in the Hill Kaka region in Poonch district, where the army conducted "Operation Sarp Vinash" last year to destroy a network of hideouts built by guerrillas at strategic heights, will now benefit from windmill-generated electricity.

The windmills will be set up along mountainous rivers in the area, according to army sources.

To begin with, the army will electrify over a dozen villages in the surroundings of Hill Kaka. The initial generation capacity would be seven KV.

....

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 22 Jun 2004 21:37

Posted by Rudra Singha

Women join village defence committees in Kashmir

Jammu, June 16 (IANS) :

The hands that fearfully fed militants in Jammu and Kashmir are now holding guns to teach them a lesson.

The first set of women volunteers to fight anti-India militants has come up in the frontier district of Poonch in the Hill Kaka area, 210 km from here.

Women have formed village defence committees (VDC) to hold guns in an area once regarded as a "liberated zone" or completely under the control of militants.

The mountainous region of Hill Kaka in Surankote, Poonch, is making news for different reasons now with women undergoing training in handling arms and ammunition.

The change has come thanks to the Indian Army, which has freed the people of Hill Kaka of militants.

While men were a little reluctant to be recruited as members of VDCs, women came forward readily as they are the ones who really face the wrath of militants.

"From feeding militants to suffering their atrocities... It was becoming unbearable for us," said one of the volunteers.

Another volunteer Shahida told a team of visiting reporters that they took up arms because militants would sometimes come when men in the village were not at home.

"At the moment we are 16, but we are certain that we would be more soon and take on any number of militants," she said.

The women have gone in for mock fights and come out successful, said the army officer who trained them.

Women who have not yet taken up arms are also getting emboldened by the VDC.

"Sure, we are impressed and this gives us extra courage. Maybe, we can also join them some day," said a woman in the village.

This is the first time that women have been listed as VDC members. There are about 1,500 VDCs fighting militancy at the grassroots level.
News about Porter Coys -

Posted by jrjraw ;)

"86 pc by order fencing complete"
SRINAGAR, June 21 (UNI) Even as the defence authorities have succeeded in fencing more than 85 per cent border, there were about 20 attempts by militants to sneak into this side from Pakistan occupied Kashmir (PoK) following melting of snow on infiltration routes, a defence ministry spoksman said.

Though the ceasefire on the Line of Control (LoC) and International Border (IB) was still holding with no report of any major violation, there had been about 20 infiltration attempts by militants, he told UNI.

He said there had been intelligence inputs that the coming weeks would witness an increase in the infiltration attempts from PoK.

Though the troops always remained alert even after the ceasefire, the night and foot patrolling all along the border had been further intensified to thwart any such attempt, he said.
He said the last week witnessed two major infiltration bids in Machil and Kachhama areas.
Eleven infiltrators, five at Machil and six at Kachhama, were shot dead and large cache of arms and ammunition including sophisticated weapons were recovered.

However, he said, fencing of 495 Kms out of total 570 Km border have also helped to check the infiltration from the PoK.

He said prior to the ceasefire, the Pakistani army used to provide covering fire by artillery, mortars and small arms to facilitate the crossing to militant groups.

It was against this back drop that the defence authorities undertook the construction of the 570 km long fence along the LoC, he said adding it was a huge task because of heavy snowfall and other odds.

So far 495 Km of the fencing has been completed and work is on in full swing to complete the task by the end of this month, he informed.

The spokesman said not only did the fence form a physical wall, it was also an electronic wall that detected movement.

The fence is paying rich dividends as over 16 attempts of exfiltration or infiltration have been foiled since the start of this year, he said adding this testify to the efficacy of the obstacle and reliability of the sensors.

He said fencing of border had also generated lot of employment and large amount of funds had been directly pumped into the state economy.

He said for the construction of the fence, the army raised 17 porter companies comprising approximately 10,200 people. There were equal number of others who got benefitted indirectly, he added.

He informed that great care had been taken by the army to ensure a people friendly alignment of the fence which was finalised only after consulting the local population.

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby Aditya G » 08 Jul 2004 20:27

The July 2004 of FORCE has the TA as the cover story. Clears up many things like "how differently is employed compared to DSC or RR?".

The article also notes how Parakram has changed the TA and where the HH and Ikhwaanis fit in.

Many a jingo should note that you can join as officer in the TA till the age of 42! (42)

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Re: Reorganizing India's COIN & Border Mgmt Forces

Postby abhejit » 14 Jul 2004 06:28

Red tape grounds BSF’s brand new chopper fleet

Home Minister Shivraj Patil’s request to take a BSF flight to Nanded was turned down last week owing to non-availability of pilots.

• Requests of the IB Director for requisitioning a flight to Adampur in Punjab and that of the CRPF Director General for a flight to Jamshedpur and Sindri in Bihar were turned down due to non-availability of aircraft.

These are just a few of the most recent examples of requisitions for flights piling up in the air wing of the Border Security Force. This despite the fact that on paper, it has a fleet of 15 aircraft maintained exclusively for border surveillance and VIP duties.

And despite the fact that nine months ago, it inducted six MI-17 IV helicopters into its fleet. These choppers, imported from Russia costing Rs 200 crore, have not once been flown for the purpose for which they were acquired.

Asked why these MI-17 choppers had not been put on VIP duty, Ajay Raj Sharma, BSF’s Director General, told The Indian Express: ‘‘BSF pilots are not trained to fly the helicopters. We took six pilots from the Indian Air Force on deputation but the agreement between the Home Ministry and the Defence Ministry is yet to be signed. In such a situation, we feel it is better not to fly VIPs than to give the task to pilots who do not have proper licences.’’

Problems have been compounded, the BSF chief said, because at present two of their Avros and one Beechcraft are grounded. ‘‘I would not call this a crisis but a transitional problem being experienced by the air wing,’’ he said.

Besides MI-17s, the BSF is also finalising deals for adding two 50-seater aircraft and one 100-seater to its fleet, he said.

Home Ministry officials point to other anomalies that have cropped up after the induction of the MI-17s.

An internal note written by the air wing’s Chief Engineer on June 30 says: ‘‘It is a matter of record that the helicopters have not flown since their arrival in Delhi due to formalities with regard to militarisation of these flying machines. Notification in this regard is yet to be issued by the Ministry of Civil Aviation. Warranty period of five helicopters is progressively expiring without any purposeful usage...’’

BSF pilots say even if the MoU is signed and the helicopters come under ‘‘military use’’, they will not be able to fly to border areas as India would have to inform Pakistan before every sortie as otherwise, it would be violation of the 1991 agreement on airspace.

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Postby Aditya G » 24 Nov 2004 11:34

Troop pullout from J&K. IIRC one 'unit' of 3 Para was also relieved. Cannot find an exact number for the troop withdrawl.

http://www.ndtv.com/

....

According to army sources, the decision to reduce troops is not a security compromise. It has been taken after factoring in the reduction in violence in the valley.

And yet like with every peace move in the state, security personnel know that this too is a gamble, a calculated risk laden with its own dangers.

"There is some element of risk and we have to take that risk because this is a part of confidence building measure. So entire strategy should fit in the grand strategy of nation. What we need is to identify those particular areas and focus them. I do agree that there is a chance of more recruitment and more localization," feels K Srinivasan, DIG BSF.

And so as winter descends on the valley and Kashmir hopes for a season of peace, everyone's fingers are crossed that the Prime Minister's attempt to heal doesn't end in bloodshed.

...


http://www.sunnetwork.org/news/regional ... p?id=10868

Troop pullout not at cost of security: Vij

Hyderabad, Nov 24 - The Chief of the Army Staff, Gen. N. C. Vij, on Tuesday made it clear that de-induction of troops in Jammu and Kashmir was being done without compromising on national security.
Talking to reporters after presenting colours to 1 EME centre here, he asserted that the troop reduction was not a "cosmetic effort" and that the Government took the decision after consulting the Army. The de-induction was not at the cost of the country's counter-insurgency posture and security requirements were taken into consideration.

Describing the de-induction as a "very good gesture" of friendship, the Army Chief said that it should be "well received by everyone." Asked whether the decision was taken due to onset of winter, he said that winter and summer were "inconsequential."

It was a gesture of friendship and taken to restore confidence on all sides. The troop pullout began eight days ago and would continue for another month. "Don't worry about numbers," he quipped, when asked about the extent of withdrawal.

Replying to a question, he said efforts to infiltrate from across the border had not reduced and eight such attempts were foiled this month. "But we have the capability to eliminate and our capacities have gone up exponentially."

...

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Postby Aditya G » 24 Nov 2004 17:09

Army ready with J&K downsize plan

Troop cut: Some 9,000 men may relocate to Himachal, no change in LoC strength, order soon

SHISHIR GUPTA

Posted online: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 at 0142 hours IST

NEW DELHI, NOVEMBER 15: Moving on Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s announcement of troop reduction in Jammu and Kashmir, Army Headquarters is all set with modalities for pulling out nearly 9,000 troops from the state. Executive orders for downsizing troop presence are expected this week.

Official sources indicated that two infantry formations, engaged in counter-insurgency operations, will be withdrawn from the state along with elements of engineers and artillery.



The J&K troop withdrawal will be accompanied by a ‘‘readjustment’’ of the counter-insurgency grid in the state with certain formations being redeployed to plug gaps left by withdrawing troops.

There will be no readjustment or withdrawal of troops from the Line of Control (LoC) where Army deployments mirror the troop strength of Pakistan.

Advance parties from the two formations being pulled out have already visited areas to which they will be relocated. While the Defence Ministry is tightlipped on the movement, it’s learnt that these formations will be relocated to Himachal Pradesh this month.

Sources said that the Army had been sounded by Defence Minister Pranab Mukherjee on the issue of troop cut in J&K a week before the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) meeting last Thursday. The exercise on the proposed troop reduction had been largely completed at the time the CCS met. The CCS meeting was attended by Army Chief General N C Vij.

As soon as the CCS okayed troop reduction, Army Headquarters forwarded the proposal to Northern Command for its recommendations. It’s learnt that the Northern Command’s recommendations have already reached Army Headquarters and the stage is set for troop withdrawal during the winter months.

Top sources said that even the Army is comfortable with Singh’s announcement on troop reduction — a significant CBM for the political process — as it will help maintain the peace-field posting cycle of formations. The withdrawing formations had been in J&K ever since the Kargil war. Although the Pakistanis claim that as many as 500,000 Indian troops are deployed in J&K, the troop strength is around 240,000. Of these, 120,000 troops are on on the international border and the LoC. In the Kashmir Valley, the Rashtriya Rifles has Victor, Kilo and Uniform force for CI operations.

Both the Government and Army are making it clear that the troop cut will be reviewed constantly by the Unified Headquarters and will depend on the level of infiltration across the LoC.

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Postby Aditya G » 01 Jan 2005 21:21

http://mod.nic.in/samachar/June01-04/body.html

59th RR Battalion (Assam) Raised

The 59th Rashtriya Rifles Battalion (Assam) was formally raised at Assam Regimental Centre, Shillong recently. This is the third RR battalion of Assam Regiment. Brig WJB Sturgeon, Commandant, 58 Gorkha Training Centre, unfurled the RR flag at a glittering ceremony held at Happy Valley, Shillong. Lt Col Suchindra Kumar has been deputed as the Commanding Officer of the battalion. The newly raised battalion comprises 24 officers, 38 JCOs and 1,141 other ranks (much larger than a standard IA Bn) posted from various battalions of the Assam Regiment.

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Postby Kakkaji » 10 Jan 2005 20:47

Mooshahary takes over as BSF DG

http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_1191122,0008.htm


Talking to reporters after taking over, he said that the force would continue to perform the role of counter-terrorism, besides guarding the borders.

The remark is in contrast to that of his predecessor who had been advocating that BSF was mainly a border-guarding force and should be confined to that role as deployment for counter-terrorism duties was hampering annual training programme of its personnel.

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Postby Kakkaji » 25 Feb 2005 09:25

From the story about the terrorist strike in Srinagar today:

http://www.indianexpress.com/full_story ... t_id=65343

Securitymen managed to pull to safety officials trapped inside. ‘‘Our first priority was to somehow get the civilians and officials out. We did that even as we fought the militants. It was one of the cleanest operations conducted by the CRPF and J&K police. It ended within three hours,’’ said IG CRPF Ranjit Sinha.

DIG operations CRPF Ahmed Ali said damage to civilian life and property would have been higher had militants made deeper incursions. ‘‘Our men managed to stop them just after they sneaked in. That’s why the operation took less time. Sadly, three civilians also lost their lives,’’ said Ali.


Looks like the CRPF and the J&K Police handled this one without calling in the BSF or the army. This shows they are getting better at urban COIN ops.8) Hopefully this is the portent of things to come.

Remember that the Punjab insurgency began to decline precipitously only after the Punjab Police recovered its composure and started going after the terrorists.

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Postby Kakkaji » 04 Mar 2005 03:07

BSF to recruit 300 surrendered militants

http://www.rediff.com/news/2005/mar/03bodo.htm

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Postby Aditya G » 08 May 2005 11:07

http://www.dailyexcelsior.com/web1/05ma ... nal.htm#10

Assam Rifles reading itself for greater role in NE

...

"So we will be giving security to the Tipaimukh Dam and also clearing the NH to facilitate vehicle movement [ROP]which will bring development in remote areas," Lt Gen Singh said.

Security, according to the DG, should not mean only fighting with arms against militants - which Assam Rifles has been doing in both guarding the Indo-Myanmar border and counter-insurgency operations in the north east, but it must encompass social and environmental angles also.

Elaborating, Lt Gen Singh said, his force would help forest authorities in preserving the woods near the Myanmar border where trees were felled and smuggled into the neighbouring country.

"We are losing revenue (because of smuggling) and our forest cover is also getting reduced day by day," the DG said.

Smuggling of narcotics was another problem in the region. Quoting a recent report of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), he said as drugs coming from Myamnar failed to reach a bigger market like Kolkata, they stopped in the north east and consumed by the people here.

"We want to arrest the menace by assisting the narcotics control bureau and other civil administrations," the DG said.

But this greater role of Assam Rifles should not mean that the force would take over others’ job. Actually it would assist others to do their jobs in a safe and secured way, lt Gen Singh said.

With the Union Home Ministry having decided to increase recruitment percentage for Central Paramilitary Forces for insurgency-prone and border areas, he has already started the enrolment process raising it from the existing 15 to 40 per cent.

This hike in recruitment from the north east would not only facilitate employment generation in the region but also wean away those who had already gone underground, he said adding "although we will not recruit without screening."

...

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Postby Aditya G » 22 May 2005 15:59

http://www.hindu.com/thehindu/holnus/00 ... 220330.htm

CRPF to supervise security of Srinagar

Srinagar, May 22 (PTI): The Centre has decided to hand over the security arrangements of the city to CRPF replacing BSF and has sanctioned the recruitment of about 5000 youths in Jammu and Kashmir in Central paramilitary forces.

"On the request of state government, we have decided that only one force, CRPF, will control the security arrangements of Srinagar city," Union Home Secretary, V K Duggal, told reporters after holding a meeting with State government representatives here.

At present, BSF and CRPF are jointly looking after the security of the city but the process of completely handing over the task to CRPF will be completed by September-October this year, he said.

In order to address the problem of unemployment in the state, he said the Centre has sanctioned recruitment of 5,000 youth in Central paramilitary forces and accepted the State's request for raising five additional battalions of Indian Reserve Police by the end of this year.

"We have sanctioned 5000 posts to be filled up in Central Reserve Police Force (3500) and Special Security Bureau (1500)," he said.

"The recruitment should be simple, follow the normal yardsticks and be spread evenly across the state," he said.

....


http://www.expressindia.com/kashmir/ful ... 18&type=ei

CRPF to replace BSF soon in areas outside Srinagar’

"In a few months time, the responsibility of internal security would be on your shoulders," said DG Jyoti Kumar Sinha. Sinha was here to present gallantry awards to the CRPF personnel for showing courage while tackling militants in the Valley. "Your role has changed now. You have to shun the defensive or protective tactic and become more pro-active," he added.

The decision to replace BSF with CRPF in a phased manner was taken by the Centre last year. In its first phase, the CRPF replaced the BSF in Srinagar city. However, the plan was put in abeyance as the fidayeen attacks on CRPF camps increased. The Union Government has now decided to withdraw the BSF personnel from other towns and rural areas of the Valley and replace them with CRPF men.

Talking to mediapersons on the sidelines of the function, Sinha said: "Gradually, CRPF would be deployed throughout the Valley. It would be done in a phased manner. The force would need some time to acclimatise before deployment."

Already, 38 CRPF battalions are already present in Kashmir. "By September, another nine battalions are reaching the Valley. While five would be deployed in Srinagar, the rest would be posted in rural areas," said the Director General. "We will get our own intelligence wing. A battalion of the force is being trained for intelligence gathering and would be deployed in the Valley," (G-Branch was the BSF's strength) he added.

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Postby Aditya G » 26 Nov 2005 22:16

Sep 2005 news

http://www.rediff.com/news/2005/sep/13bsf.htm

CRPF replaces BSF in Kashmir

Aijaz Hussain in Srinagar | September 13, 2005 10:50 IST

The Border Security Force on Tuesday announced the replacement of its troops engaged in counter-insurgency operations with the Central Reserve Police Force in Srinagar. The BSF will, however, continue its anti-insurgency operations in the countryside of Jammu and Kashmir.

Announcing this at Srinagar, BSF Inspector-General J B Negi said nine battalions (about 9,000 troops) of the BSF were withdrawn from Srinagar on Tuesday.

"In pursuance of the Union government's order, the BSF has been directed to look after its basic duties of border guarding and hand over the counter-insurgency operations to the CRPF," Negi said.

...

The de-induction started in 2003 and initially eight battalions were withdrawn from north Kashmir. "The complete withdrawal of BSF will be achieved by 2007," Negi said.

The Kashmir chief of the BSF said since1990, they had killed as many as 2,700 militants and arrested over 10,000 of them. He also claimed to have killed 38 top guerrilla commanders during this period.

Negi said only one battalion of the BSF would continue to function in Srinagar for the security of Raj Bhawan and Gupkar Road, which house the residence of the former chief minister Farooq Abdullah and different intelligence agencies of the central government.

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Postby ASPuar » 26 Nov 2005 23:08

I wonder if this is such a good idea. The BSF has acquired a certain knowledge of CT operations in the valley, and gathered expertise in their conduct. The CRPF doesnt have such an advantage, and in the year or two it will take them to aclimatize, terrorist activity may redouble.

The BSF is one of the more professional CPMF's, along with the AR. The CRPF, is IMO one of the weaker, and shakier CPMFs, with a larger number of structural, and disciplinary problems than the aforementioned. They are also far less accustomed to combat operations, being more of a civil order mainenance sort of a force. In effect, they are much more 'civillian' than the bsf or AR.

I hope that they will be up to the job, and wont get slaughtered.

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Postby Aditya G » 27 Nov 2005 11:53

ASPuar wrote:I wonder if this is such a good idea. The BSF has acquired a certain knowledge of CT operations in the valley, and gathered expertise in their conduct. The CRPF doesnt have such an advantage, and in the year or two it will take them to aclimatize, terrorist activity may redouble.


It had to happen sooner or later. The Kashmir Terrorism problem would have required an indefinite BSF deployment. We have let our western and eastern border thinly guarded for long enough. The good thing is that India will eventually have a dedicated and competent COIN force large enough to tacle threats across the country. The CRPF can be called into all situations where the RR cannot be deloyed.

The BSF is one of the more professional CPMF's, along with the AR. The CRPF, is IMO one of the weaker, and shakier CPMFs, with a larger number of structural, and disciplinary problems than the aforementioned. They are also far less accustomed to combat operations, being more of a civil order mainenance sort of a force. In effect, they are much more 'civillian' than the bsf or AR.


I agree with your assessment, that the BSF is pretty much an "Army in Khaki". CRPF is just what it is called - a central police force for emergency law and order duty whenever the local state police forces are unable to cope up with the situation. They are especially required in case of communal violence. Not sure what you mean by structural problems in CRPF.

A curious debate that was fueled by the GoM headed by LK Advani was to classify the paramils into two broad categories: Central Para-Military Forces (CPMFs) and Central Police Organisations (CPOs). According to this the breakup would be;

CPOs: CRPF, NSG, CISF
CPMFs: BSF, ITBP, AR, RR, SSB

So CRPF is indeed different from BSF given its 'police' nature. It can use this to its advantage, since insurgencies are better handled by policemen. The difficult part is build up the adequet military skill to beat the terrorists on the ground.

I hope that they will be up to the job, and wont get slaughtered.


CRPF has already faced the brunt of a number of sucide attacks on their camps in the past couple of months. IIRC it was the CRPF which developeda doctrine for anti-fidayeen tactics, so lets not think that they are incompetent guys caught in the wrong place.

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Postby Aditya G » 27 Nov 2005 12:02

http://www.kashmirsentinel.com/septnov2000/

The Role of Para-Military Forces in Countering the Terrorist Challenges in India within the overall Security Strategy

By Prakash Singh

Terrorism has spread far and wide in different parts of the world. It has made a profound impact on India also. We have had (and continue to have) terrorism of the tribals in the North-East, of the Naxalites in Andhra and Bihar particularly, of the separatists in Punjab and the militants in Kashmir. On a conservative estimate, about 40,000 lives are believed to have been lost in the terrorist incidents in different parts of the country. We lost a Prime Minister (Indira Gandhi), an ex-Prime Minister (Rajiv Gandhi) and a former Army Chief (General Vaidya).

The responsibility for the maintenance of law and order, under the Constitution, vests in the state governments. Unfortunately, however, there has been over the years a gradual erosion in the striking power of the state police forces. A number of factors have contributed to this phenomenon. There have been no reforms in the police. On the contrary, there has been increasing politicization of the force. What is worse, there is now a growing nexus between the politicians, criminals and the civil servants and policemen. As a result, we have the strange spectacle of law enforcement agencies not being able to cope with even routine law and order duties. Dealing with motivated and well equipped terrorists becomes well nigh an impossible proposition.

In such a scenario, the paramilitary forces naturally get sucked into all kinds of internal security situations. We find them assisting the state police forces during agitations, demonstrations, religious festivals, communal riots and elections. The state police forces consider it a matter of right to call for the paramilitary forces while dealing with terrorists. There is no gainsaying that terrorists are a tough lot and require specialised handling. It should nevertheless be possible for the state police forces to deal with minor terrorist groups like those of the Marxist-Leninists and any other formations which have a regional complexion only. The terrorist movement in Punjab and militancy in Kashmir are of course in a different category. Even in these areas, the problem would perhaps not have assumed such serious dimensions if the first symptoms had been dealt with firmly. In any case, without going deeper into this question of handling or mishandling of terrorist problem while it is still in embryonic stage, let it be conceded that there was and is adequate justification for the induction of paramilitary forces in the kind of situations that obtained in Punjab and continues to prevail in Kashmir.

The paramilitary forces were raised at different periods of time for specified purposes. The Border Security Force (BSF) was raised as an Armed Force of the Union by amalgamating 25 battalions of various States Armed Police Forces in the wake of the border incursions that preceded the Indo-Pak War in 1965. It was designed essentially to guard the frontiers of the country and assist the Army during war time. The Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), which was originally the "Crown Representative's Police" was renamed as the Central Reserve Police Force on December 28, 1949. Its basic role is that of a striking reserve to be placed at the disposal of States/UTs for operations of short duration and return to the barracks once the task is accomplished. The Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP) was raised in 1962 in the wake of the Sino-Indian Conflict to guard the Indo-Tibetan border from the Karakoram Pass in J&K to Lipulekh Pass in UP. The Assam Rifles' charter is to ensure security of the North-Eastern sector of the international border and maintain law and order in the tribal areas of Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Mizoram and Manipur. The National Security Guard (NSG) was raised to neutralise terrorist threat in any specified area and to handle hijack situation involving piracy in the air and on land. The Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) is meant primarily to provide security to the industrial undertakings owned by the Central government.

It would thus appear that only the Assam Rifles and the NSG had terrorism as a component in their charter of duties. We find however that the Border Security Force, the CRPF and the ITBP have all been extensively utilized in anti-terrorist operations in different theaters. The seriousness of the situation and the inability of the state forces left the Union government with no option but to deploy these forces to face the challenges posed by the separatist and secessionist terrorist groups.

The Border Security Force has been deployed to deal with the internal security situation in the north-east and is bearing the brunt of insurgency in the urban areas of J&K. According to the latest figures available, 269 Coys (out of total of 942 Coys) of the BSF are today committed on internal security duties in different areas. Earlier, when terrorism was at its peak in Punjab, the BSF was deployed in strength in anti-terrorist operations in that state.

The CRPF has unfortunately lost its reserve character due to prolonged deployment in operational areas. It is estimated that more than 98 per cent of the force is deployed on the ground and out of this total 88 per cent is in the active theatres of North-East, J&K, Andhra Pradesh and Bihar.

The ITBP was deployed in Punjab during the worst phase of terrorism in that State. Though a good part of the Force was utilized for guarding the banks in the wake of incidents involving looting of banks by the terrorists. The Assam Rifles bore the initial onslaught of the Chinese aggression during the Sino-Indian Conflict (1962) and held on until the Army was able to take up positions. The force has played a significant role in counter-insurgency operations in Nagaland and Manipur, particularly during the wars in 1965 and 1971, when the Army was withdrawan from these states. The NSG is the country's elite paramilitary unit. It was put to good use in Punjab against the terrorist. Of late, however, the force has unfortunately been deployed more to protect the VIPs than to uphold the country's vital interests in areas affected by terrorism.

The paramilitary forces are experiencing certain difficulties in performing their mandated role. These are briefly as follows:

*the forces are diverted from their primary role

*the bulk of the forces are deployed with the result that there are no reserve for training

*overstretching the forces is having an adverse effect on their discipline and morale

*overlapping responsibilities are given to different paramilitary formations

*routine jobs are given to CPMFs with the state police forces abdicating their responsibilities

*lack of coordination at the apex between the CPMFs and the state police forces.

The paramilitary forces have an undoubted role in dealing with security situations, particularly in areas affected by terrorism and insurgency. It is however essential that the state police forces are revitalized and given the necessary training and equipment so that they are able to deal with the situations and there is no undue dependence on the central paramilitary forces. The force level of the CPMFs should also be suitably augmented so that the prescribed minimum reserves are available for training.

There are reports in the media that the four paramilitary forces, namely the BSF, CRPF, ITBP and CISF are to be brought under a unified command. The details are not available but we would have to guard against the temptation to raise mega forces. The BSF has already a strength of 157 battalions while the CRPF has grown to a strength of 137 battalions. Combining them in any form would create more problems than help in resolving any. What is important is that the forces are utilized for the purposes for which they were raised, ensure that any diversion from their mandated role takes place under compelling circumstances and for a limited duration only and reducing, if not eliminating altogether, the political considerations in the diversion of forces, and augmenting their strength to an optimum level where they are able to deal with the problems and challenges they have to face without adversely affecting their training, discipline and moraler

*The author retired as DG BSF. His works on naxalite movement and north-east establish him as a creative thinker on national security

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Postby Aditya G » 27 Nov 2005 13:14

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2005/20050329/nation.htm#3

CISF keen on changing name
Tribune News Service

New Delhi, March 28
After having undergone a metamorphosis in its profile during the past few years, the Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) is now keen to change its name and replace the word ‘industrial’ with ‘internal’ to more accurately reflect its responsibilities.

This minor and subtle change will also ensure that the initials of one of the country’s largest para- military force remain unchanged, as they had come to be accepted and known all over.

A communication to this effect has already been sent to the Ministry of Home Affairs with a detailed note why it had become imperative to go for a name change at this stage.

A majority of officers and personnel was unhappy with the word ‘industrial’ as they felt this put them more or less on a par with private security guards employed by industrial units and the name did not reflect the character and function of the para-military force.

Sources said that the request was being seriously considered and the help of the law department was being sought to bring about the required legislative changes that would be required to amend the original Act through which the force was raised in March 1969. On June 15, 1983, the CISF was made an armed force through another Act of Parliament.

Raised initially to provide security to government installations and public sector undertakings (PSUs), the CSIF had in the past few years given the responsibility of providing security to at least a dozen airports, including some international ones, in the country. Obviously satisfied by its performance, the authorities had recently indicated that they would like the force to take up the responsibility of more airports, including some in the sensitive North Eastern states of the country.

The government has also taken a decision to hand over VIP security to this force in order to relieve the elite commando force, National Security Guard (NSG), presently deployed on VIP security, for operational requirements. The CISF at present is engaged in raising a ‘specialised’ security unit of commandos for this purpose.

...


http://www.dailyexcelsior.com/web1/03ja ... onal.htm#1

CISF to take over VIP security; NSG, ITBP to be eased out

NEW DELHI, Jan 5: After taking charge of security of vital installations across the country in the wake of growing terrorist threats, the Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) would soon start providing protection to the VIPs currently guarded by commandos of the elite NSG, ITBP and some other forces.

At least three battalions of CISF, comprising around 3,000 personnel, have been earmarked for receiving special training in providing the proximate security, sources in the force told PTI here today.

About 500 such personnel have already completed training and are ready for deployment, they said.

The commandos will replace in a phased manner the NSG and the ITBP which are at present providing security to about 300 ‘protected persons’ enlisted by the Union Home Ministry in ‘x’, ‘y’ and ‘z’ categories, the sources said.

The decision to induct these commandos into VIP protection, expected shortly, comes as per the recommendation of the Group of Ministers (GoM) last year which favoured that NSG, ITBp, CRPF and other forces providing VIP security be relieved from such duties so that they could concentrate on the tasks they had been created for.

Incidentally, there has been a growing need for deployment of NSG commandos, specially trained in counter-terrorism operations such as anti-hijacking, anti-kidnapping drills, at various places across the country in the wake of increasing terror threats.

"The Home ministry, which had asked the CISF to earmark the personnel for training, has been apprised of the fact that 500 commandos are ready for deployment and a decision to induct them is expected any time," a source said.

Modalities regarding the category of protected persons —‘x’, ‘y’ or ‘z’ — which the CISF commandos would take charge in the first phase are being worked out.

The CISF personnel have been imparted seven-week rigorous specialised training in all aspects of proximate security at its Deoli (Rajasthan) training centre.

A couple of batches of CISF personnel were sent to NSG’s Manesar training centre to learn the intimate drills about the VIP security and they in turn taught these drills to the new commandos, they said.

The commandos have been trained in quick reaction drills, unarmed combat, defensive driving besides sharp and sniper firing.

NSG Director General R S Mooshahary, when contacted for comment, welcomed the move and said it would allow the NSG to concentrate more on its prior intended tasks of counter-terrorism. (PTI)

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Postby ASPuar » 27 Nov 2005 19:48

AdityaG, Im sure CRPF arent incompetent. But being that their past competence has lain in a different field, I think tey may have some issues starting out. Also, structurally, I dont think that the CRPF is very accustomed to working in an integrated batallion structure. AFAIK the company commanders are usually deployed far and wide and there is no real concept of Battalion Area of Responsibility, since a company of CPMF is sufficient to deal with most minor communal and other flare ups.

Im sure they will be working out new formulas.

Im not too sure what it is that the SSB does really. Any ideas?
What is the concept of "Area organizers" within the organisation?

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Postby Aditya G » 27 Nov 2005 22:01

hi ASPuar,

The SSB today is purely a Border Guarding Force ("BGF") responsible for the India-Nepal and India-Bhutan border. Its deployed in Uttranchal, UP, Bihar, West Bengal, Sikkim, Assam and Arunanchal Pradesh to accomplish the said mission. They have been conducting anti-smuggling and other operations.

SSB is potentially our lead force against the Nepalese maoists. However, till date I am yet to hear of any major incident between these two.

IMHO it should be merged with the ITBP, given the overlapping of the states. This will also increase the size of the ITBP, giving its commanders greater flexibility in rotation and deployment.

Dont know really. maybe equivalent to BSF Commandant etc (???) they also have "Sub Area Organizer" post.

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Postby Kakkaji » 28 Nov 2005 02:09

From dailypioneer.com. Posting in full as the URL may not be archived:

http://dailypioneer.com/indexn12.asp?ma ... nter_img=3

Army allowances make blue BSF see red

Pramod Kumar Singh/ New Delhi

Resentment is brewing in the Border Security Force (BSF) over Ration Money Allowance (RMA). There is a feeling in the force that despite being the first line of defence of the country they are yet to get RMA, while the officers of the Army have been getting it since ages.

BSF Director-General RS Moosahari, who last week made a presentation before Home Minister Shivraj Patil, emphasised over the issue and demanded that the force should be placed at par with the Army as far as RMA is concerned.

The DG contended that RMA is paid to only those operational commanders of the BSF who are posted in the terrorist-infested or strife-torn areas, where as Army officers get RMA even if they are posted in peaceful areas.

"Armymen even get 'Rum Allowance', which is not available to BSF personnel," he said. The DG reportedly told the Home Minister that there is an under current of resentment among the lower and upper subordinates of the force over the issue and it needs to be addressed immediately, sources said.

In his presentation, the BSF chief also reiterated the need to revise the pay structure of the lower and upper subordinate on the lines of Delhi Police. A proposal in this regard was sent to the Ministry of Finance, which refused to consider it said that in the event of the BSF and the Delhi Police personnel getting the same pay, the BSF should also adhere to the promotion policy of the Delhi Police.

While a BSF Head Constable is promoted to Sub-Inspector (SI) rank, a Delhi Police Head Constable gets promoted as Assistant Sub-Inspector, a rank below than the SI.

The DG also demanded that those posted at the borders should be provided mobile phones for better communication and coordination. The Ministry of Finance shot down the proposal too, as it did not see any merit in this demand. The ministry said that BSF people are not entitled for this. The Home Minister did agree to provide money from the Police Modernisation Fund for this purpose. He asked the DG to work out the details and provide a list of different rank holders who could be covered under the scheme, sources added.

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Postby Anoop » 28 Nov 2005 06:52

The SSB traditionally had a significant "civilian aid" component to it, making it a "Special Force" in the US sense of the term. I wonder if it still forms part of the charter and how that would be impacted if it were combined with a police force like the ITBP.

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Postby Aditya G » 19 Dec 2005 19:54

Originally posted by YIP:

Marks, Thomas A., "India: State Response to Insurgency in Jammu & Kashmir – The Jammu Case," 2004.

http://www.smallwars.quantico.usmc.mil/ ... rticle.pdf

Good info and very well written.

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Postby Kakkaji » 02 Jan 2006 08:52

Special force to hunt Naxalites

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1060102/a ... 670465.asp

“The best boys have been picked up from several battalions and are undergoing strict and special army training at Silchar training school. Unlike our regular forces, they are being trained to be on their own in the most inhospitable terrain for 15 days at a stretch,” Sinha said.

“We intend to send one company to each of the 11 Naxalite-affected states. Like the Grey Hounds, they will be on the job continuously which means 10-15 days’ tracking missions, 10-15 days’ training and then back on the job.”

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Postby Kakkaji » 04 Feb 2006 03:44

Wanted: Air muscle to beat Maoists

http://www.telegraphindia.com/1060204/a ... 803487.asp

New Delhi, Feb. 3: Jharkhand wants an air force.
This is no flight of fancy. Across seven states, governments are uniformly worried at the growth of the Naxalite movement led by the Communist Party of India (Maoist). But it is the Jharkhand government that is grappling with this out-of-the-box idea because terrain, fear and administrative weaknesses have combined to render the police force ineffective against the better-organised rebels.

The study draws inspiration from an analysis of tactics used by the British General Gerald Templar before 1945 in Malaysia, which exemplified the “classic use of force coupled with development of the economy and strengthening of democratic local self-government against the Chinese-backed communist insurgents”.

At the core of the fighting fleet, the study has detailed, would be Dhruv Advanced Light Helicopters manufactured by the defence public sector Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL).

The study was done before a Dhruv being supplied to the Jharkhand government crashed near Hyderabad in November and the consequent temporary grounding of the chopper by the armed forces.

The study recommends that the JAG should have two Dhruvs (capable of carrying 12 passengers) to start with and acquire four more in the second phase. It wants an additional two Dhruvs in the two plus six (two crew and six passengers) in the second phase. It would also have two Chetak helicopters to start with and four more in the second phase.

Apart from the helicopters, the air guard should have three Raytheon King Air B-200 aircraft and two Beech Baron B-55 (already with the state government) for casualty evacuation and VIP flights.

In the second phase of the expansion, the study has recommended the induction of one Citation X Executive Jet or a Dassault Falcon Business Jet, a Cessna 172 configured to land and take off from waterbodies (the study gives the example of the Massanjore reservoir) and Skyhawk and Robinson 44 aircraft for the flying training unit.

The primary chopper-borne forces will be handpicked fighters from the Special Task Force that has been carved out of the Jharkhand Armed Police.

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Postby Victor » 04 Feb 2006 12:17

This paramil air fauj is way overdue (JAG is nice :twisted: ). Although the Citation and Falcon business jets sound like some babu's/minister's expensive wet dream, aircraft like the Tucano, the HTT-34 and the Kiran can be used. Chetaks and Cessnas will soon become easy targets for ground fire as the situation escalates and heavier weapons show up in the commie arsenal.

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Postby A Sharma » 21 Mar 2006 23:23


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Postby JCage » 22 Mar 2006 06:28

Victor wrote:This paramil air fauj is way overdue (JAG is nice :twisted: ). Although the Citation and Falcon business jets sound like some babu's/minister's expensive wet dream, aircraft like the Tucano, the HTT-34 and the Kiran can be used. Chetaks and Cessnas will soon become easy targets for ground fire as the situation escalates and heavier weapons show up in the commie arsenal.


Napalm the Maoists! :twisted:

On a more serious note: I hope they extensively use UAVs for recce and use heliborne forces to advantage. The Maoists have limited access to weapons for now and are dependent upon IED's to mine access roads. Using choppers will take that advantage away.

Zero tolerance for the commie scum.


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